The most harmful thing Americans are doing to our oceans is turning to bottled water

Costco announced on Wednesday that it was limiting shoppers to buying only four six-packs of toilet paper in one transaction. No other discounts, no other deals, it’s plain brown toilet paper only. That means that …

Costco announced on Wednesday that it was limiting shoppers to buying only four six-packs of toilet paper in one transaction. No other discounts, no other deals, it’s plain brown toilet paper only.

That means that even though this is a good deal for small businesses like me, it doesn’t encourage me to buy it the way I used to. Instead, when I first saw Costco’s announcement that it would limit toilet paper purchases, I immediately thought about if I should just forget this water restriction and buy more. It was a good idea at the time.

According to Costco, the decision to limit toilet paper and water to four packages per customer is due to “higher than anticipated demand.”

That comes as no surprise to many: The liquid fluoride craze has taken off in recent years, even though everyone knows it’s a fake. And while most of us treat the water from our faucets and kitchen sinks to go over our tea before we brush our teeth, some people think the bathroom is too restrictive and want to try to artificially mimic the shine and freshness of an actual glass of water.

This means that tens of millions of people around the world are consuming purified water every day, which is perfectly fine. But at the same time, one of the biggest challenges facing our oceans is trying to keep up with the threat of plastic pollution.

Many times when I collect my glass of water and try to give it away, I hit a limit.

When I need to refill the empty containers, I’m faced with having to wait an hour for my empty bottle to be refilled. It might be taking one of these EcoPoppers out to the grocery store that will make the longest wait.

As a result, my goal is to replace this bottled water, instead of buying more.

While this is not a threat to my public health or environment, it does contribute to the pollution of oceans. So yes, let’s limit toilet paper and water to four units per customer.

Even though I am a small business owner, I’m able to turn a blind eye to this: as my current clients who drink filtered water will help me order 4-packs of eco-friendly toilet paper for five dollars less a roll.

When I first saw Costco’s announcement, I was speechless with questions: Why did they ban toilet paper and water? Is this the solution? What are we doing to our nation’s oceans? If you have a question to ask, I’m available to answer! I’ll be at my office until 7 p.m. tonight for the transaction limit and will also be happy to talk to you on Mondays at 12 p.m. (no kidding).

h/t Library Journal

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