Drake fronts $1M after Vancouver nightclub altercation?

By Mo Collins, CNN Contributor It’s not the outcome either man was hoping for. Just four days after Drake hit some trouble with an alleged assault in a Vancouver nightclub, he’s back in a courtroom. …

By Mo Collins, CNN Contributor

It’s not the outcome either man was hoping for.

Just four days after Drake hit some trouble with an alleged assault in a Vancouver nightclub, he’s back in a courtroom.

This time, the controversial artist (who’s married to a model and has two children) is facing a lawsuit over the incident.

He still hasn’t lost his temper.

“No one is entitled to $1 million dollars for that nonsense,” Drake said outside a Vancouver courtroom Wednesday.

He’s currently fighting for three months of back pay and $16,000 to cover attorneys’ fees and costs, a one-year ban from ever setting foot in the city’s nightclubs and evidence of a court order regarding alcohol consumption.

“[I] have nothing to do with the shenanigans behind that; this guy’s had his chance to be heard,” he said, according to MTV. “Apparently he was pretty peeved because he had to plead guilty to something here last year; he had nothing to do with the place, nothing to do with the event. Nothing to do with the whole debacle.”

First, a brief recap from March 20: Some longtime B.C. residents filed a lawsuit against the hip-hop star over a nightclub altercation in 2015.

According to the suit, The Social Club employed bouncers who violently approached Drake, and one of the men allegedly punched him during an argument.

Drake reportedly called the incident a “brutal attack” and said he experienced “physical injuries.”

Police investigated, but there was no mention of charges against the rapper.

However, a Vancouver man named Quinte James Vazquez filed a civil suit on March 20, alleging assault, reckless endangerment and assault with a weapon against Drake and The Social Club.

And on Tuesday, Vazquez allegedly disappeared before a court date.

Ethan Corley, Vazquez’s attorney, told CBC News that he told his client to show up to court at 10 a.m. but he never showed up. He believes his client received pressure to back out of the lawsuit.

Drake, who’s in Vancouver to promote his latest album “Scorpion,” returned to court Thursday to support the bar’s bar owner, Brian Quayle.

His attorney, Neil Dorst, said the club did not violate any liquor laws.

“So, Drake, your client, is essentially telling you, ‘Don’t worry. We don’t do anything wrong. The bar owner has done nothing wrong,’” Dorst told the court.

Dorst added that police left out a lot of details about the original event and that both he and his client have talked to Vazquez.

“Drake has paid a considerable sum of money to my client, who is clearly a victim of Quinte’s extortion attempt,” Dorst said.

Drake’s attorney also had concerns that Vazquez wanted to use the lawsuit to make money. He said Drake couldn’t give them much money because the attack happened two years ago.

“We do know that Mr. Vazquez has a history of violence. He is someone who has pled guilty for offences — some of which, we believe, were past unlawful conduct.”

Dorst denied that Drake had paid Vazquez in order to avoid the civil suit, saying that he and his client simply don’t know what it’s all about.

Lies and media coverage have hurt Vazquez’s credibility, Dorst said. He added that he’s never actually heard from the rapper.

“I find it very disturbing that it’s actually he who’s brought shame on himself, rather than the basis of which I’m sitting in front of the court,” Dorst said.

None of the allegations in the civil suit has been proven.

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